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tabla f. (Noun) "plank;" "slab"

12th cent. From Latin tabula "board." From Proto-Italic *taflā- 'id.' Of uncertain origin.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese talião, Italian taglione
tajar (Verb) "to cut"

10th cent. From Latin taliare 'id.' From talea (botanical) "cutting" (see tálea).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian tabla, Portuguese tala, Catalan taula, French table, Italian tavola ; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Romanian tablă ; Sardinian: taba

Italic: Umbrian tafle "on the table"
tal (Adjective) "such"

10th cent. From Latin talis 'id.' From Proto-Italic *tāli- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *teh2-li̯- 'id.' from the demonstrative stem *teh2.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese tal, French tel, Italian tale ; Romanian tare

Indo-European: Celtic: Welsh talu "to pay," Middle Breton taluout "to be worthy," Cornish tal "to pay;" Balto-Slavic: Old Church Slavonic tolь "so much," Lithuanian tõlei "until;" Hellenic: Ancient Greek τηλίκος (telíkos) "of such an age"
tálea f. (Noun) "Roman palisade"

From Latin talea "stick." Of unknown origin.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Italian talea
talento m. (Noun) "talent;" (money) "talent"

12th cent. From Medieval Latin talentum 'id.,' borrowed from Ancient Greek τάλαντον ‎(tálanton) "talent," "balance." From Proto Indo-European *tl̥h2-ent- "bearing." From the root *telh2- "to bear."

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese talento, tento, Catalan talent, French talent, Italian talento
tamaño m. (Adjective, Noun) "big;" "size"

11th cent. Old Spanish tamanno. An adjectival from the Latin phrase tam magnus "so great." For the etymology of tam, see tan; for the etymology of magnus, see magno.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian tamañu, Portuguese tamanho, Galician tamaño
también (Adverb) "also"

13th cent. From tan and bien.
tampoco (Adverb) "neither"

13th cent. From tan and poco.
tañer (Verb) (music) "to play"

12th cent. Originally meaning "to touch." The sense development parallels tocar. From Latin tangere "to touch." From Proto-Italic *tang-e- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *th2-n̥-g- 'id.' From the root *teh2g- of the same meaning.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese tanger, Italian tangere

Italic: Umbrian antakres "by the untouched"

Indo-European: Germanic: Gothic tekan "to touch," Old Norse taka "to take," "to touch," English to take; Hellenic: Ancient Greek τεταγών (tetagón) "having seized;" Tocharian: B ceśäṃ "to touch"
tantear (Verb) "to estimate"

Late 15th cent. Probably verb formed from tanto, though the semantics are hazy.