The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
parar (1) (Verb) "to stop;" "to place a bet"

10th cent. Originally meaning "to situate." From Latin parare "to prepare." The sense evolution was from positioning an object to keeping the object still. From Proto-Italic *parā-je/o- "to prepare." A derivation of Proto-Indo-European *perh3- "to provide" (see also parir).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese parar, French parer, Italian parare

Indo-European: Celtic: Gaulish ieuru "he offered," Old Irish ernaid "to grant;" Hellenic: Ancient Greek ἔπορον (époron) "provided;" Indo-Iranian: Sanskrit pr̥ṇā́ti "he gives,"
parar (2) m. (Noun) (game) "lansquenet"

From parar (1) in a secondary sense of placing a bet.
parecer m. (Verb, Noun) "to seem;" "opinion"

As a verb, first attested in the 10th cent.; as a noun, 16th cent. From Vulgar Latin *parescere 'id.,' from Latin parere "to appear" with the inchoative infix -scere (see -ecer). For the etymology of parere, see parar (1).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese parar, French parer, Italian parare
pared f. (Noun) "wall"

11th cent. From Latin parietem, accusative of paries 'id.' Of unknown origin.

Also the origin of the names of towns in Cuenca, Mdrid, Toledo, and Palencia.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese parede, Galician parede, Catalan paret, French paroi, Italian parete ; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Romanian parete ; Sardinian: parada
pareja f. (Noun) "pair"

12th cent. From Vulgar Latin *paricula "little pair," a diminutive of Latin par "pair" (see par).
parir (Verb) "to bear (children)," "to birth"

11th cent. From Latin parire 'id.' From Proto-Italic *per-i- "to bring forth," or a more general meaning of "to bear" not exclusive to childbirth. From Proto-Indo-European *pérh3-i̯- 'id.' From the root *perh3- of the same meaning.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian parir, Portuguese parir, Galician parir, Catalan parir

Italic: Faliscan amparihmu "he erected" (*an- "on" and par-ī-je- "furnished")

Indo-European: Celtic: Gaulish ieuru "he offered," Old Irish ernaid "to grant;" Hellenic: Ancient Greek ἔπορον (époron) "provided;" Indo-Iranian: Sanskrit pr̥ṇā́ti "he gives,"
París m. (Noun) "Paris"

Reduction of the original name in Late Latin, Lutetia Parisiorum "Lutetia of the Parisii." The city's true name was Lutetia (or as recorded by Strabon Λουκοτοκία (Loukotokía)), of unknown origin, and was the chief hub of the Parisii. Matasović (2014) identifies Lutetia as the "mud-town," from Proto-Celtic *lutu- "mud," and ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *leu-to- 'id.' The Parisii were a Celtic tribe conquered by Julius Cæsar during the uprising of Vercingetorix. Like Lutetia, their name is of unknown origin.
parque m. (Noun) "park"

Early 17th cent. Borrowed from French parc "park," but in Old French meaning "enclosure." From Medieval Latin parcus 'id.' Borrowed from a Germanic source (compare Old English pearroc "enclosure"). From Proto-Germanic *parruka- 'id.' An enclosure made of beams. From earlier *(s)porH- "beam." A regional innovation in a very late form of Proto-Indo-European, presumably borrowed from an outside source.

Germanic: West Germanic: Old English pearroc "enclosure"
parque m. (Noun) "park, garden;" "enclosure for munitions," "enclosure for military vehicles"

Early 17th cent. Borrowed from French parc "park," "enclosure," "game preserve." From Late Latin parricus 'id.' The natively-inherited word in Spanish is parra (1).
parra (1) f. (Noun) "grapevine"

8th cent. The only convincing etymology is from Late Latin parricus "enclosure" which was borrowed from Gothic *parra 'id.' (Mason 1979; Corominas 1991). This is supported on the basis of cognates in nearby Romance tongues (cf. Occitan parran "orchard," French parc "enclosure"). An older theory of an origin in Basque has been thoroughly rejected (Dworkin 2014).

Also the origin of La Parra, the name for towns in Badajoz, Cuenca, and Toledo; Las Parras, a province in Teruel; and Las Parras de Castellote, a province in Zaragoza.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian parra

Subirse a la parra "to aggrandize (one's ego)." A metaphor, as raising a vine is likened to raising one's self-importance.