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madre f. (Noun) "mother;" "village elder"

11th cent. From Latin matrem 'id.,' accusative of mater. From Proto-Italic *mātēr 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *méh2-tēr 'id.' From *meh2-, a root of unknown meaning. Perhaps originally meaning "mother" with *-tēr added by analogy with *ph2ter "father" (see padre).

As a surname de la Madre, perhaps originally given to individuals in reference to the tertiary meaning of madre: terrain cut by a brook or a river. Equally plausible, however, is that it was given in devotion to Mary, mother of Jesus, in Christianity.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian madre, Portuguese mãe, Galician mai, Catalan mare, French mère, Italian madre

Italic: Oscan maatreís "of the mother," Umbrian matres 'id.,' Faliscan mate "mother," South Picene matereíh "to the mother"

Indo-European: Celtic: Old Irish máithir "mother," Germanic: Old High German muoter 'id.,' Balto-Slavic: Old Church Slavonic mati "mother," Lithuanian mótė 'id.,' Albanian: motër "sister;" Hellenic: Ancient Greek μήτηρ (méter) "mother;" Armenian: mayr "mother;" Indo-Iranian: Sanskrit mātár- "mother," Avestan mātar- 'id.;' Tocharian: A mācar "mother," B mācer 'id.'

According to Benveniste (1973), in Indo-European society, the woman who raised the child was called *anna, while the woman with the official title of mother was *māter. This was paralleled in men as well, the man who raised the child was *atta, while the official father was *pəter.
maestro m. (Noun) "teacher"

10th cent. From Latin magistrum, accusative of magister 'id.,' from magis "great" and *-tero- (see más and -tr- respectively).

Unusual variants maestre, maese derive from the nominative and vocative cases of magister respectively. Rare examples of native reflexes from declension cases other than the accusative. These examples form the origins of the surnames Maestro, Maestra, Maeso, Maese, Maesso, Maes, Maestud, and Mastro.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian maestru, Portuguese maestro, Galician mestre, Catalan mestre, French maestro, Italian maestro; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Romanian maestru; Sardinian: maistru
magia f. (Noun) "magic"

17th cent. Borrowed from Latin magia 'id.,' itself borrowed from Ancient Greek μαγεία ‎(mageía) 'id.,' derived from μάγος (mágos) "mage" (see mago).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese magia, French magie, Italian magia
magno (Adjective) "great"

Borrowed fom Latin magnus 'id.' From Proto-Italic *magno- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *m̥ǵ-no- 'id.' From the root *meǵh2- "much."

Also the origin of the surname Magnet.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese magno, Italian magno

Indo-European: Celtic: Gaulish Magios (name) "great," Middle Irish maige "large;" Gothic: Gothic mikils "large," Old Norse mikill 'id.,' Old High German mihhil 'id.,' Old Saxon mikil 'id.,' Old English micel 'id.' (Middle English muchel, English much); Albanian: madh "large;" Hellenic: Ancient Greek μέγας (mégas) "large;" Armenian: mec "large;" Indo-Iranian: Sanskrit máhi- "large," Avestan mazōi "big;" Tocharian: A māk "many," B māka 'id.;' Anatolian: Hittite mekk- "much," Cuneiform Luwian maia- "many"
mago (Noun) "magician;" "wizard"

13th cent. From Latin magus 'id.' Borrowed from Ancient Greek μάγος (mágos) "mage." Borrowed from the name of the Magos, the priestly caste of Medes. The meaning and origin of the name is unknown.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese mago, Italian mago
majestad f. (Noun) "majesty"

From Late Latin maiestatem, accusative maiestas "authority." Derived from maior "greater" (see mayor) and -tas, a noun-forming suffix (see -dad).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese majestade, French majesté
mal (Adverb, Noun) "badly;" "bad," "evil"

12th cent. From Latin male "badly," from malus "bad" (see malo).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese mal, Catalan mal, French mal, Italian male; Sardinian: mabi
mala f. (Noun) "bag" (of a mail carrier)

Borrowed from Old French male "bag." Borrowed from a Germanic source, possibly Frankish (compare Middle Dutch male 'id.'). From Proto-Germanic *malha- 'id.' Of unknown origin, presumably borrowed from an outside source.

Germanic: North Germanic: Old Norse malr "knapsack;" West Germanic: Old High German malaha "bag"

Hellenic: Ancient Greek μολγός (molgós) "bag (of cow leather)" The appurtenance of -g- points to a borrowing from Thracian.
maldecir (Verb) "to curse"

Early 13th cent. From Latin maledicere "to curse." From male "badly" and dicere "to speak" (see malo and decir respectively).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese maldizer, Catalan maleir, French maudire, Italian maledire; Sardinian: maledíxiri
maldición f. (Noun) "curse"

15th cent. From Latin maledictio 'id.,' from maledicere "to curse." From male "badly" and dicere "to speak" (see malo and decir respectively).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese maldição, Catalan maledicció, French malédiction