The only free and comprehensive online etymological dictionary of the Spanish language
lígula f. (Noun) "ligule"

16th cent. From Latin ligula "spoon," from earlier lingula "spoon" but literally "small tongue." From lingua "tongue" (see lengua).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Italian lingula; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Aromanian lingurã, Romanian lingură
limpio (Adjective) "clean"

12th cent. A borrowing from Late Latin limpidus "clean," but originally "clear." Probably originally referring to liquids and waters, in which case this maybe a borrowing from Sabellic *limp- "liquid" (Solta 1967). From an earlier Sabellic verb *limp-ē "to be liquid," derived from Proto-Italic *linkw-ē- "to leave." From Proto-Indo-European *li̯-n-kw-ē- 'id.' A nasal-present from a root *u̯lei̯kw- "to wet."

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese límpido, French limpide, Italian limpido; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Aromanian limpid, Romanian limpede
lindo (Adjective) "cute," "pretty"

13th cent. Old Spanish lindo meant "pure," "good." Possibly from Latin legitimus "legitimate" through *lidmo (legitimus > *leitimo > *liidimo; cf. Old Portuguese liidimo "legal"). Legitus derives from Latin lex "law" (see ley).
línea f. (Noun) "line"

13th cent. Old Spanish liña. From Latin linea 'id.,' literally "line of thread." From lineus "flaxen," from linum "flax." From Proto-Italic *līno- 'id.' The variation between *lino- and *linto- means this is probably a loanword from a non-Indo-European language.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian llinia, Portuguese linha, Catalan línia, French ligne, Italian linea ; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Romanian linie

Italic: Latin linteum "cloth," "sail," linteō "weaver" (linto)

Balto-Slavic: Baltic: Old Prussian lynno "flax," Lithuanian lìnas 'id.,' Latvian lini 'id.;" Church Slavic: lьnъ "flax;" East Slavic: Russian lën "flax;" West Slavic: Czech len "flax," Polish len 'id.;' South Slavic: Slovene lȃn "flax"

Hellenic: Ancient Greek λίνον (línon) "linen," Mycenaean ri-no 'id.'
lisa f. (Noun) "mullet"

16th cent. Borrowed from Catalan llísa 'id.' Of unknown origin. Probably borrowed from a substrate Iberian language (compare Santander dialect alisa 'id.'). Lisa replaced the native Spanish word liza (c. 1326), of the same origin.

Dialect Variants: Cantabria alisa "mullet"
liso (Adjective) "smooth"

14th cent. From Vulgar Latin lisius 'id.' Borrowed from Ancient Greek λισσός (lissós) 'id.' A derivation of λίς (lís) 'id.' Mycenaean ri-ta. From Proto-Indo-European *lh1i̯-t- 'id.'
lista f. (Noun) "list;" "stripe"

Meaning of "stripe" dates to 14th cent.; first written attestion of "list" is 18th cent. From Italian lista 'id.,' from Old High German lista "border, "strip of land."

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese lista, French liste, Italian lista
listo m. (Adjective) "skillful," "ready"

16th cent. Probably from Vulgar Latin *lex(i)tus, past participle from Latin legere "read," "gather." See leer.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian lleer, Portuguese ler, Galician ler, Catalan llegir, French lire, Italian leggere; Sardinian: lègere
lo (1) (Definite Article) "the"

From Latin illum, accusative of ille "he," "that" (see el (1)).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian el, Portuguese o, Galician o, French le, Italian il; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Aromanian -lu, Romanian -l
lo (2) (Pronoun) "it;" "him"

From Latin illud "that one," from Old Latin ollum. See ello.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian el, Portuguese o, Galician o, French le, Italian il; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Aromanian -lu, Romanian -l