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deber m. (Verb, Noun) "to owe;" "duty," (plural) "homework"

As a verb, first attested use is in the 12th cent.; as a noun, 16th cent. From Latin debere "to owe" but originally "to withhold." From de- (see de-) and habere "to have" (see haber).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian deber, Portuguese dever, Galician deber, Catalan deure, French devoir, Italian dovere; Sardinian dèpere

"This literal interpretation corresponds to an actual use: [Latin] debeo is used in circumstances in which one has to give back something belonging to another and which one keeps without having literally “borrowed” it; debere is to detain something taken from the belongings or rights of others. Debere is used, for instance, for “to owe the troops their pay” in speaking of a chief, or the provisioning of a town with corn. The obligation to give results from the fact that one holds what belongs to another. That is why debeo in the early period is not the proper term for “debt.”" ~ E. Benveniste, Indo-European Language and Society (1973)
debido (Adjective) "due"

12th cent. Sense of moral obligation is from 16th cent. From deber.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian deber, Portuguese dever, Galician deber, Catalan deure, French devoir, Italian dovere; Sardinian dèpere, depi
débil (Adjective) "weak"

15th cent. From Latin debilis 'id.' From Proto-Italic *dē-bel-i- "without strength." From *dē- "undoing of" (see de-) and *bel- "strength." From Proto-Indo-European *bel-o- 'id.,'

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian débil, Portuguese débil, Galician débil, Catalan dèbil, French débile, Italian debole, debile; Eastern Vuglar Latin: Romanian debil; Sardinian: débbile, débbili

Indo-European: Balto-Slavic: Old Church Slavonic boļii "bigger," Russian ból'šij 'id.' BCS bȍljī 'id.;' Hellenic: Ancient Greek βέλτατος (béltatos) "best;" Indo-Iranian: Sanskrit bála- "strength"
decidido (Adjective) "decided"

16th cent. From decidir.
decidir (Verb) "to decide"

16th cent. From Latin decidere "to decide" but literally "to cut down." From de- "from," "away" (see de- and caedere "to fall" (see caer).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese decidir, Catalan decidir, French décider, Italian decidere; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Romanian decide
decir m. (Verb, Noun) "to say;" "saying"

10th cent. From Latin dicere "to say." From Proto-Italic *deik-e/o- 'id.' From Proto-Indo-European *dei̯ḱ-e/o- 'id.'

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian dicir, Portuguese dizer, Galician dicir, Catalan dir, French dire, Italian dire; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Aromanian dzãtsiri, Romanian zicere

Italic: Oscan deíkum, Umbrian teitu "he said," Marrucinian *-dix "said," Marsian *-dis 'id.,' Paelignian *-dix 'id.,' Volscian *-dix 'id.'

Indo-European: Germanic: Gothic ga-teihan "to indicate;" Hellenic: Ancient Greek δείκνῡμι (deíknymi) "to show;" Indo-Iranian: Sanskrit diś- "to show," Old Avestan dāiš "you showed"
decisión f. (Noun) "decision"

16th cent. From Latin decisionem, accusative of decisio 'id.' From the verb decidere "to decide," but commonly "to cut off" (see decidir).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian decisión, Portuguese decisão, Galician decisión, Catalan decisió, French décision, Italian deicisione; Eastern Vulgar Latin:Romanian decizie
dedo m. (Noun) "finger"

12th cent. From Latin digitus 'id.' Of unknown origin.

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Asturian deu, Portuguese dedo, dígito, Galician dedo, Catalan dit, French doigt, Italian dito; Eastern Vulgar Latin: Aromanian dzeadzit, Romanian: deget; Sardinian: didu
defender (Verb) "to defend"

12th cent. Borrowed from Latin defendere 'id.' From Proto-Italic *dē-χwnd- 'id.' From *dē- "away" (see de-) and *χwend- "to hit." From Proto-Indo-European *gwhen-dh- 'id.'

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese defender, Catalan defendre, defensar, French défendre, Italian difendere

Indo-European: Celtic: Old Irish gonaid "to wound," Welsh gwan "to hit," Old Cornish goanaff "to sting," Middle Cornish gwana 'id.;' Balto-Slavic: Old Church Slavonic gъnati "to persecute," Lithuanian gìnti "to defend;" Hellenic: Ancient Greek θείνειν (theínein) "to strike;" Armenian: ǰnem 'id.;' Indo-Iranian: Sanskrit hánti "kills;" Anatolian: Hittite kuen-zi "to kill," Lycian qãñti "they destroy"
defensa f. (Noun) "defense"

Late 15th cent. Borrowed from Latin defensa 'id.' From defendere "to defend" (see defender).

Romance: Western Vulgar Latin: Portuguese defender, Catalan defendre, defensar, French défendre, Italian difendere